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Cereal Rye – Hazlet

$0.68 per lb.

Bulk Discount Pricing

2 - 9 lbs.
$0.61 / lb.
10 - 19 lbs.
$0.54 / lb.
20 - 29 lbs.
$0.47 / lb.
30 - 39 lbs.
$0.41 / lb.
40 - 49 lbs.
$0.34 / lb.
50+ lbs.
$0.27 / lb.

Cereal Rye has an excellent fibrous root system that alleviates surface compaction. Rye can be successful planted later then almost any other cover crop due to its low germination and growth temperature requirements. Cereal rye is known for being the best cereal crop at retaining residual N. It’s typical for a fall planted cereal rye crop to scavenge on average 25 to 50 lbs of N, with cases scavenging in excess of 100 lbs of N. The vigorous spring growth has successful weed suppression through competition and allelopathic chemicals. Rye can be terminated in the spring through the alternative methods of rolling, mowing, or crimping after boot stage. Rye will out yield any other cereal crops when planted in droughty, infertile, or sandy soils.

Basic Info

Maturity
May-June
Seeds/lb
23,000
C/N Ratio
40-48:1
Growth Habit
Erect
Winter Hardiness
Zone 3

Use

Cereal rye is one of the most versatile and commonly used cover crops in the country. Rye is the most winter hardy of all cereal crops in various growing conditions. It's most commonly planted in a corn/soybean rotation, before a soybean crop the following season. This species is known for its late fall to early spring nutrient scavenging, grazing potential and erosion control. This species remarkable spring growth, has the potential to produce a lot of residue or forage. The residue is a great harbor for beneficial insects, most notably lady bugs. Also, the residue gives off allelopathic chemicals up to a month after termination, which aids in preventing small seeded weeds and grasses from germinating.

Nitrogen Fixing Potential
N/A
N Scavenge
10
Dry Matter
6,000-10,000
Lasting Residue
5-9
Erosion Control
10
Traffic Bearing
7
Grazing Potential
8
Forage Harvest
8
Root Type
Deep, Fibrous
Soil Builder
10
Cash Crop Interseeding
7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Advantages

Cereal Rye has an excellent fibrous root system that alleviates surface compaction. Rye can be successful planted later then almost any other cover crop due to its low germination and growth temperature requirements. Cereal rye is known for being the best cereal crop at retaining residual N. It's typical for a fall planted cereal rye crop to scavenge on average 25 to 50 lbs of N, with cases scavenging in excess of 100 lbs of N. The vigorous spring growth has successful weed suppression through competition and allelopathic chemicals. Rye can be terminated in the spring through the alternative methods of rolling, mowing, or crimping after boot stage. Rye will out yield any other cereal crops when planted in droughty, infertile, or sandy soils.

Subsoiler
3
Surface Compaction
10
Rendering P & K
7
Traffic Bearing
7
Nematode Control
6
Disease Control
7
Allelopathic Effect
10
Weed Control
10
Short Growth Time
10

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Disadvantages

The biggest challenge with rye is attributed to the residue produced but this can be reduced with an early termination of the cover when it reaches a height of 6-8". First, the residue excretes allellopathic chemicals during decomposition which maybe effect your next crop if not managed correctly. These chemicals can be excreted in the soil for up to a month after termination and are more effective at suppressing the germination of small seeded and grass species. When planting corn into a terminated rye cover, it is encouraged to delay planting 10-14 days after termination. Second, the more rye growth in the spring equates to higher soil water usage. In humid regions, spring water usage is justified because the extra residue helps retain moisture and reduce soil temperature during a hot, dry summer. If moisture conditions are forecasted to be dry then earlier termination is highly recommended. Third, with maturity comes the risk of nutrient (especially N) tie up problems from ryes high carbon residue. An early rye termination or having legumes mixed within the stand, will reduce this risk. Finally, rye is not recommended in fields where cereal crops are in the desired rotation due to seed contamination issues.

Weed Potential
6
Potential Insect/Nematode Risk
5
Crop Disease Risk
3
Effect Cash Crop
7
Ease of Establishment
3
Ease of Till-Kill
3
Ease of Chem-Kill
3
Ease of Mow-Kill
2

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Planting

Cereal Rye is commonly drilled or broadcasted in the fall. Many producers broadcast rye into soybeans at leaf yellowing or corn when the canopy allows 50% of the sunlight to reach the ground. A successful broadcast seeding, is directly correlated to the amount of soil moisture or rain fall that is present after the application. Plants will start to emerge 5-8 days after planting. To achieve a good winter cover, it's suggested that planting occurs before October 10th in most areas. Planting after October 10th will result in reduced winter cover but a spring cover will still be obtained. An earlier planting allows the rye to acquire a larger percentage of the residual N from the soil profile. If this species is planted in the spring then growth will remain short, won't set seed and will die within a few months because vernalization didn't take place.

Ideal Planting Time
Aug-Oct
Ideal Planting Depth
3/4 - 2"
Min Germination Temp(F)
34
Drilled Seeding Rate (lb./A)
60 - 120
Broadcast Seeding Rate (lb./A)
90 - 160
Reseeding Potential
Low

Tolerance

Rye can be planted later than most other species because it only requires 34F to germinate and 38F for vegetative growth. This species prefers a well drained, sandy loam soil but will tolerate a heavy, wet or acidic soil. Rye is the most winter hardy cereal crop and will grow best in a cool, temperate climate. Cereal ryes extreme cold tolerance is displayed through the plants ability to survive exposure to -31F.

Heat
5
Drought
7
Shade
7
Wet Soil Tolerance
5
Low Fertility
10
pH
5 - 7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent