tam_tbo_small

Annual Ryegrass – Tam Tbo (Tetraploid)

SKU: 1115

$2.25 per lb.

Out of stock

Bulk Discount Pricing

2 - 9 lbs.
$2.02 / lb.
10 - 19 lbs.
$1.80 / lb.
20 - 29 lbs.
$1.57 / lb.
30 - 39 lbs.
$1.35 / lb.
40 - 49 lbs.
$1.12 / lb.
50+ lbs.
$0.90 / lb.

Extending the grazing season while protecting and building the soil is a great benefit of this species. The biomass N content can range from 1.3-2.4% this can vary depending on the amount of residual N left from the previous crop. Reports of annual ryegrass having the potential to scavenge up to 200 lbs of residual N/A/yr have been recorded. Ryegrass can be very successfully broadcast into established row crops. Winter killed ryegrass can still provide weed suppression, soil protection and trap residual N until spring. Ryegrass attracts very few pest insects that could pester the next crop. With lower needed seeding rates per acre means you will spend less of freight an your applicator can remain in the drill or in the air longer.

I like the deep roots of annual ryegrass but when considering it for more northern area, it must be established prior to hard freezing in order to have the best chance of winter survival.     keith@greencoverseed.com

Basic Info

Maturity
Medium
Seeds/lb
190,000
C/N Ratio
Medium
Growth Habit
Erect
Winter Hardiness
Zone 5b-6a

Use

Extending the grazing season while protecting and building the soil is a great benefit of this species. The biomass N content can range from 1.3-2.4% this can vary depending on the amount of residual N left from the previous crop. Reports of annual ryegrass having the potential to scavenge up to 200 lbs of residual N/A/yr have been recorded. Ryegrass can be very successfully broadcast into established row crops. Winter killed ryegrass can still provide weed suppression, soil protection and trap residual N until spring. Ryegrass attracts very few pest insects that could pester the next crop. With lower needed seeding rates per acre means you will spend less of freight an your applicator can remain in the drill or in the air longer.

Nitrogen Fixing Potential
N/A
N Scavenge
8
Dry Matter
Medium
Lasting Residue
7
Erosion Control
9
Traffic Bearing
10
Grazing Potential
8
Forage Harvest
8
Root Type
Deep Fibrous
Soil Builder
10
Cash Crop Interseeding
10

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Advantages

Extending the grazing season while protecting and building the soil is a great benefit of this species. The biomass N content can range from 1.3-2.4% this can vary depending on the amount of residual N left from the previous crop. Reports of annual ryegrass having the potential to scavenge up to 200 lbs of residual N/A/yr have been recorded. Ryegrass can be very successfully broadcast into established row crops. Winter killed ryegrass can still provide weed suppression, soil protection and trap residual N until spring. Ryegrass attracts very few pest insects that could pester the next crop. With lower needed seeding rates per acre means you will spend less of freight an your applicator can remain in the drill or in the air longer.

Subsoiler
8
Surface Compaction
10
Rendering P & K
7
Traffic Bearing
10
Nematode Control
5
Disease Control
5
Allelopathic Effect
4
Weed Control
10
Short Growth Time
10

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Disadvantages

The largest concern with ryegrass is the severe weed risk if not managed properly. Ryegrass has shown herbicide resistance to glyphosate when not applied perfectly. If you still would like to utilize glyphosate use 3pt/A of glyphosate when biomass is actively growing between 6-9" tall, under sunny conditions with temperatures above 50F. Its vital that the ryegrass is actively growing to allow systemic chemical to be properly taken into the plant. Annual ryegrass is known to be one of the top ten most herbicide tolerant plants in the country. Ryegrass is known for exhausting water and N resources, which can compete heavily with desired crops if allowed. Planting in a field where a cereal crop will be grow for seed production within a few rotations isn't recommended.

Weed Potential
7
Potential Insect/Nematode Risk
3
Crop Disease Risk
3
Effect Cash Crop
5
Ease of Establishment
8
Ease of Till-Kill
6
Ease of Chem-Kill
7
Ease of Mow-Kill
2

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Planting

As with many other small seeded grass, a fine, firm seed bed will result in the best establishment. Though this isn't always possible, it's not an issue because ryegrass can very easily be established when broadcast, even into an established crop. With strong seedling vigor and competitive growth, ryegrass is able to smother weed pressure even under cool soil temperatures. Seeding late in the fall can greatly increase the possibility of winterkill. If planting in zone 5 or colder then plant at least 40 days before a killing frost to obtain enough growth to justify the seed cost. If wanting to graze or hay the biomass then a high seeding rate should be applied because ryegrass doesn't tiller much. When aerial seeding many pilots don't want to utilize cereal grass a the recommended rate due to bulkiness. Annual ryegrass lower seeding rates allows the applicator to remain in the air longer which should equate to cheaper rates.

Ideal Planting Time
Spring or Late Summer/Early Fall
Ideal Planting Depth
1/4-1/2"
Min Germination Temp(F)
40
Drilled Seeding Rate (lb./A)
15-20
Broadcast Seeding Rate (lb./A)
20-30
Reseeding Potential
Possible

Tolerance

Ryegrass can be successfully grown in many soil conditions but will thrive in fertile, well drained, loam soils. Ryegrass can withstand heavy, waterlogged or even temporally flooded soils. Cereal crops are out competed by ryegrass under wet soil conditions. Though sandy soils are not ideal due to droughtiness, it's possible to grow ryegrass if the soil is fertile. Though ryegrass is cold tolerant, it won't withstand severe winter weather unless protected and it won't tolerate a hot, dry summer. Compacted soils aren't an issue because the dense fibrous root system can break through and alleviate the compaction. Ryegrass is fairly tolerant of salinity and can be grown in soils with a pH range of 5.0-8.0

Heat
4
Drought
5
Shade
8
Wet Soil Tolerance
9
Low Fertility
4
pH
5.0-8.0

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent