Brown Mustard

Brown Mustard: Kodiac

$4.88 per lb.

Bulk Discount Pricing

2 - 9 lbs.
$4.39 / lb.
10 - 19 lbs.
$3.90 / lb.
20 - 29 lbs.
$3.42 / lb.
30 - 39 lbs.
$2.93 / lb.
40 - 49 lbs.
$2.44 / lb.
50+ lbs.
$1.95 / lb.

Mustard produces significantly more glucosinolates than other brassicas, which biofumigates the soil during decomposition, proving to be toxic to many soil pathogens and pests. To best utilize these glucosinolates, mature green vegetation should be turned into the soil. In no-till operations you will still benefit from having this species for this use. When allowed enough growing season, brown mustard stem residue can remain erect throughout the winter months, aid in capturing snow to help build moisture in the soil profile. Growing mustard in a potato rotation was observed to increase tuber quality and yields similar to that of chemically fumigated fields. Other documented effects of having mustard in your rotation is suppressing potato early dying and reduced root rot in pea rotations. Some customers are concerned that these mustards are difficult to control like their wild cousins but actually they can be easily terminated with many commonly utilized herbicides.

Basic Info

Maturity
75-90 days
Seeds/lb
100,000
C/N Ratio
12-30
Growth Habit
Upright
Winter Hardiness
Zone 7

Use

Mustard produces significantly more glucosinolates than other brassicas, which biofumigates the soil during decomposition, proving to be toxic to many soil pathogens and pests. To best utilize these glucosinolates, mature green vegetation should be turned into the soil. In no-till operations you will still benefit from having this species for this use. When allowed enough growing season, brown mustard stem residue can remain erect throughout the winter months, aid in capturing snow to help build moisture in the soil profile. Growing mustard in a potato rotation was observed to increase tuber quality and yields similar to that of chemically fumigated fields. Other documented effects of having mustard in your rotation is suppressing potato early dying and reduced root rot in pea rotations. Some customers are concerned that these mustards are difficult to control like their wild cousins but actually they can be easily terminated with many commonly utilized herbicides.

Nitrogen Fixing Potential
N/A
N Scavenge
30-120
Dry Matter
3,000-9,000
Lasting Residue
3
Erosion Control
8
Traffic Bearing
5
Grazing Potential
5
Forage Harvest
1
Root Type
Fibrous Taproot
Soil Builder
7
Cash Crop Interseeding
7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Advantages

Mustard produces significantly more glucosinolates than other brassicas, which biofumigates the soil during decomposition, proving to be toxic to many soil pathogens and pests. To best utilize these glucosinolates, mature green vegetation should be turned into the soil. In no-till operations you will still benefit from having this species for this use. When allowed enough growing season, brown mustard stem residue can remain erect throughout the winter months, aid in capturing snow to help build moisture in the soil profile. Growing mustard in a potato rotation was observed to increase tuber quality and yields similar to that of chemically fumigated fields. Other documented effects of having mustard in your rotation is suppressing potato early dying and reduced root rot in pea rotations. Some customers are concerned that these mustards are difficult to control like their wild cousins but actually they can be easily terminated with many commonly utilized herbicides.

Subsoiler
6
Surface Compaction
7
Rendering P & K
5
Traffic Bearing
5
Nematode Control
10
Disease Control
7
Allelopathic Effect
7
Weed Control
8
Short Growth Time
7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Disadvantages

Be sure not to add mustard into a rotation where another brassica is desired for harvest, due to the potential for disease transfer. Brown mustards pose a possible weed risk if the moderately quick flowering is allowed to produce seed. Seed produced in the field can have hard seed which can germinate over several years. If this risk bothers you then choose another mustard or brassica species to utilize. Bio-toxic effects from decomposing, green plant material can negatively effect a cash crop. This is most severe when green plant material is worked into the soil profile. Therefore planting should be delayed until three weeks after the mustard has been terminated. This cultivar would not be suggested for grazing or hay production because it can harmful if consumed by livestock in large portions. When interseeded into a crop, this species can grow very tall within the canopy and desication will be required or harvesting issues will occur.

Weed Potential
7
Potential Insect/Nematode Risk
3
Crop Disease Risk
1
Effect Cash Crop
5
Ease of Establishment
1
Ease of Till-Kill
1
Ease of Chem-Kill
3
Ease of Mow-Kill
7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Planting

Mustards rapid emergence will occur within 5-7 days. This species thrives in cooler conditions and a good establishment is easy to achieve when sufficient moisture is available. Mustard needs sufficient N and S for optimum growth with the ideal ratio being 6:1. Sulfur is needed by the plant to produce glucosinolates, which contributes to the bio-fumigant effect. Add only a couple pounds of seed to a mixture, to avoid out competing other species. If seed production is a concern delay planting long enough to allow the mustard to winterkill before mature seed is developed but early enough to insure sufficient growth. This would require establishing brown mustard only five weeks before the first frost date.

Ideal Planting Time
March-May & Aug-Sept
Ideal Planting Depth
1/4 - 3/4"
Min Germination Temp(F)
40
Drilled Seeding Rate (lb./A)
5-8
Broadcast Seeding Rate (lb./A)
10-15
Reseeding Potential
Very Possible

Tolerance

Mustard can tolerate low fertility soils ranging from well drained to moderately well drained. Soils prone to ponding or flooding, especially at establishment can prove ensifficant for mustard. Though mustard can withstand minor freezes, it will winter kill around 20-25 F. If salinity is an issue in your soils you may want to consider utilizing mustard as it will preform as well as barley. This species doesn't have much tolerance for shading therefore it could prove difficult to interseed into a standing cash crop. We attempted to interseed brown mustard into our corn at V7 and the shading from the corn proved to control the mustard from ever developing. For this reason mustards work best when established the same time as other species in the field. Mustards excellent drought tolerance sets it apart from other brassicas in dry times.

Heat
6
Drought
8
Shade
3
Wet Soil Tolerance
3
Low Fertility
7
pH
5.5-7.5

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent