Nitro Radish

$4.13 per lb.

Bulk Discount Pricing

2 - 9 lbs.
$3.72 / lb.
10 - 19 lbs.
$3.30 / lb.
20 - 29 lbs.
$2.89 / lb.
30 - 39 lbs.
$2.48 / lb.
40 - 49 lbs.
$2.06 / lb.
50+ lbs.
$1.65 / lb.

Rapid fall growth in short windows, allows radishes to fit perfectly into a traditional corn and soybean rotation. Radish residue breaks down very quickly in the spring, leaving a clean seed bed until early April. The residue has been proven to inhibit small seeded annuals from germinating. Nutrients that were scavenged are readily released back into the soil for the subsequent crop. A field planted in radishes, will allow the soil to dry and warm faster in the spring. The large root channel left behind is rich in nutrients, allows tremendous water infiltration, reduces water erosion, and a path for crops roots to follow through compacted soil layers. During decomposition, radish biofumigates the soil which can reduce pest and nematode populations.

 

 

Basic Info

Maturity
N/A
Seeds/lb
25,000
C/N Ratio
20:1
Growth Habit
Basal Rosette
Winter Hardiness
Frost killed below 25F

Use

Radishes claim to fame was achieved through its renowned taproot, rapid fall growth and its ability to scavenge residual nutrients. Their roots have the potential to grow several inches in diameter with a thick taproot extending 12 - 20" into the soil and a smaller taproot that can reach depths around 6'. This massive root is capable of penetrating plow pans or compaction layers in your soil. This process is referred to as "Bio-drilling" and it's able to replace the need for deep tillage on your operation. Scavenging residual nutrients is this species specialty. Radishes are extraordinary at scavenging residual nutrients such as N, P, K, S, Ca and B and releasing them back into the soil profile in the spring for your upcoming crop. Under perfect conditions, radish has been proven to accumulate around 100-150 lbs/A of N. This species is excellent to plant after a manure application, in ordered to capture the readily available nutrients from being lost to the environment. The residue produced is known for it's fall and early spring weed suppression. Radishes have been proven to boost wheat yields 5 bushel when 2 lbs/A was added at planting.

Nitrogen Fixing Potential
N/A
N Scavenge
10
Dry Matter
4,000-7,000
Lasting Residue
3
Erosion Control
6
Traffic Bearing
3
Grazing Potential
7
Forage Harvest
3
Root Type
Deep Tap root
Soil Builder
7
Cash Crop Interseeding
5

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Advantages

Rapid fall growth in short windows, allows radishes to fit perfectly into a traditional corn and soybean rotation. Radish residue breaks down very quickly in the spring, leaving a clean seed bed until early April. The residue has been proven to inhibit small seeded annuals from germinating. Nutrients that were scavenged are readily released back into the soil for the subsequent crop. A field planted in radishes, will allow the soil to dry and warm faster in the spring. The large root channel left behind is rich in nutrients, allows tremendous water infiltration, reduces water erosion, and a path for crops roots to follow through compacted soil layers. During decomposition, radish biofumigates the soil which can reduce pest and nematode populations.

Subsoiler
10
Surface Compaction
6
Rendering P & K
7
Traffic Bearing
3
Nematode Control
7
Disease Control
5
Allelopathic Effect
8
Weed Control
10
Short Growth Time
8

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Disadvantages

There aren't many serious disadvantages to this species. The largest concern a farmer would have is the disease potential if another brassica species was to be commercially harvested. The radishes growth is dependent upon length of growing season and N availability. When radishes begin to decay in the warming early spring, the decomposition emits a foul rotten-egg like smell. If radishes are planted in the spring then you can expect reduced root growth, slower development and seed production will cause a weed threat. Avoid adding to much radish seed to a mix because of its rapid growth, competition issues could occur with other species. I would suggest just adding 2 lbs/A of radish seed into a mix for a drilled application.

Weed Potential
5
Potential Insect/Nematode Risk
3
Crop Disease Risk
1
Effect Cash Crop
1
Ease of Establishment
1
Ease of Till-Kill
1
Ease of Chem-Kill
1
Ease of Mow-Kill
1

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Planting

Radish is commonly drilled or broadcasted in the fall. Many producers broadcast radish into soybeans at leaf yellowing or corn when the canopy allows 50% of the sunlight to reach the ground. Drilling a monoculture stand is best achieved with a small seeder box. Radishes can be planted at a depth of an inch in a drought or deeper when part of a mixture. When using a precision planter, milo plates may be used with a reduced seeding rate of 2-4 lbs/A. Emergence will occur between 3-5 days in moist soils. A successful crop should be planted at least one month before your areas first frost date. Full canopy closure is possible to achieve within 3-4 weeks after planting. A lower plant population will result in larger radishes and vise versa.

Ideal Planting Time
August - mid September
Ideal Planting Depth
1/4 - 1/2"
Min Germination Temp(F)
45
Drilled Seeding Rate (lb./A)
5-10
Broadcast Seeding Rate (lb./A)
8-12
Reseeding Potential
Possible

Tolerance

Radish prefers a somewhat poorly drained to well drained soil. This species won't tolerate wet soils nor will it tolerate standing water. Radishes are highly responsive to N and will not perform well on infertile soils. Broadleaf herbicide residual is a real concern but isn't fully understood. Winterkill will occur with a frost below 25F or several nights below 20F. A late planting will result in less "bio-drilling" and weed suppression but substantial N scavenging can still be achieved. Even a radish that reaches the size of a pinky finger will produce a tuber that will reach 5-12" into the soil. A small radish has a better likely hood of over wintering, especially if protected by snow or residue.

Heat
5
Drought
3
Shade
5
Wet Soil Tolerance
2
Low Fertility
3
pH
6.0-7.5

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent