black_oats_small

Black Oat: Cosaque

$0.80 per lb.

Bulk Discount Pricing

2 - 9 lbs.
$0.72 / lb.
10 - 19 lbs.
$0.64 / lb.
20 - 29 lbs.
$0.56 / lb.
30 - 39 lbs.
$0.48 / lb.
40 - 49 lbs.
$0.40 / lb.
50+ lbs.
$0.32 / lb.

Black oat packs the forage yield potential of rye with the higher nutrient density, digestibility and palatability of more traditional oats. Though the biomass matches tonnage of rye, the C:N ratio will tend to be a little lower in comparison. Oats is excellent at breaking disease cycles and also has been shown to resist root-knot nematode. Allelopathic chemicals from plant decomposition have a proven effect against broadleaf weed species. Black Oat makes an excellent crop for someone just getting started with covers because it can be easily terminated with an array of methods. Unlike common oats, black oat have excellent tillering potential to get the ground covered quicker. Black oat is less prone to insect problems than either wheat or barley and has been shown to greatly reduce take-all of wheat.

Basic Info

Maturity
June
Seeds/lb
22,000
C/N Ratio
20-60:1
Growth Habit
Upright
Winter Hardiness
Zone 8

Use

Totated for its high quality forage potential, black oats dark green, broad grass blades are pack with highly suitable nutrient density. N applications have been show to greatly influence CP levels within the forage. With dense fibrous roots reaching 33-77" into the soil profile, oats can produce a mellow seed bed for the proceeding crop. When grown above winter zone 8, winterkill is a serious concern.The winterkill residue increases the winter survival of slower establishing species by shielding the winter environment. Meanwhile weed suppression through competition and allelopathic chemicals can be observed.

Nitrogen Fixing Potential
0 / NA
N Scavenge
10
Dry Matter
6,000-10,000
Lasting Residue
8
Erosion Control
10
Traffic Bearing
5
Grazing Potential
10
Forage Harvest
10
Root Type
Fibrous
Soil Builder
8
Cash Crop Interseeding
7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Advantages

Black oat packs the forage yield potential of rye with the higher nutrient density, digestibility and palatability of more traditional oats. Though the biomass matches tonnage of rye, the C:N ratio will tend to be a little lower in comparison. Oats is excellent at breaking disease cycles and also has been shown to resist root-knot nematode. Allelopathic chemicals from plant decomposition have a proven effect against broadleaf weed species. Black Oat makes an excellent crop for someone just getting started with covers because it can be easily terminated with an array of methods. Unlike common oats, black oat have excellent tillering potential to get the ground covered quicker. Black oat is less prone to insect problems than either wheat or barley and has been shown to greatly reduce take-all of wheat.

Subsoiler
3
Surface Compaction
7
Rendering P & K
5
Traffic Bearing
5
Nematode Control
5
Disease Control
5
Allelopathic Effect
8
Weed Control
10
Short Growth Time
10

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Disadvantages

Though black oats is a winter cereal, it's still the least winter hardy and least drought resistant of all cereal grain species. Explaining why this species can only be utilized as a winter annual in the southern US. Several consecutive nights in the teens will likely cause heavy winterkill damage. Planting black oat to early in the fall increases its odds for winterkill and/or lodging. Poor seed production yields of 800-1400 #/A, cause this species to be more expensive than other cereal grains. Black oat can host ergot and fusarium head blight. Becoming a weed risk only if grown in southern regions and allowed to reach maturity in a field going to cereal crop production. Oat roots are described as not being very effective at breaking up compacted soils at depth. Of all the small grain species, oats require the most soil moisture which could deplete soil moisture for subsequent crops in dry conditions. Over grazing can easily deplete a stand and potassium levels in the forage should be monitored when fed to milking cows for possible metabolic problems.

Weed Potential
3
Potential Insect/Nematode Risk
4
Crop Disease Risk
3
Effect Cash Crop
4
Ease of Establishment
1
Ease of Till-Kill
3
Ease of Chem-Kill
1
Ease of Mow-Kill
7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Planting

Black oat can be utilized very similarly to more common oats. The exception to this is black oat has more seeds per pound therefore the seeding rate can be reduced compared to common oats. If planting a monoculture cover crop, sow black oat at 40-70#/A but if for forage production sow 80-100#/A. Seed production rates can be as low as 40# PLS/A, with only 60-80 units of N. Utilize as a winter annual in the southern US or in early spring/late summer as an annual throughout the country. Drilling is the most recommended application method but broadcasting can be effective. Planting in the fall provides a nurse crop, nutrient scavenger, forage and possible winterkill residue. If planting as a nurse crop sow 1-1.5 bushel per acre. Shallow seeding under moist soil conditions, will speed emergence and lessen the risk of root rot.

Ideal Planting Time
Early SpringAug. - Sept.
Ideal Planting Depth
1/2 - 1 1/2"
Min Germination Temp(F)
38
Drilled Seeding Rate (lb./A)
80
Broadcast Seeding Rate (lb./A)
100
Reseeding Potential
Possible

Tolerance

Black oat grows best in cool, moist environments, with soils that are moderately fertile. This species has the potential to be grown on a wide range of soils and can tolerate a wider pH range then wheat or barley. Hot, dry weather conditions can really cause black oat to struggle. Though breed for the best winter hardiness, its still no match for several consecutive nights in the teens, which limits its use as a winter annual to areas below the MO, KY, KS southern borders. Black oat is one of the most sensitive cover crop species to residual herbicide damage. If growing for seed production lodging can be a serious concern with to much available N. Black oat is highly resistant to barley yellow dwarf virus but is moderately susceptible to crown and stem rusts. Be sure to wait at least two weeks after termination before planting a cash crop after oats to minimize any negative effects from allelopathic chemicals that are excreted during decomposition.

Heat
5
Drought
3
Shade
5
Wet Soil Tolerance
5
Low Fertility
5
pH
4.5 - 7.5

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent