Winter Barley: Saturn

$0.68 per lb.

Bulk Discount Pricing

2 - 9 lbs.
$0.61 / lb.
10 - 19 lbs.
$0.54 / lb.
20 - 29 lbs.
$0.47 / lb.
30 - 39 lbs.
$0.41 / lb.
40 - 49 lbs.
$0.34 / lb.
50+ lbs.
$0.27 / lb.

Barley has relatively low water usage compared to other cover crop species, especially during earlier growth stages. Under poor fertility conditions, barley would be a good choice and can help render P & K available for your next crop. Barley provides a good feed quality grain that can be harvested 2-3 weeks earlier than wheat which then allows your double crop/cover to be planted sooner. Compared to oats, barley produces more tillers and vegetation that will remain erect longer after termination. Carbohydrates known as monosaccharides are excrete through the roots to feed the soil biology and barley has been observed to release more monosaccharides than even alfalfa.

Basic Info

Maturity
June-July
Seeds/lb
15,000
C/N Ratio
Straw 80:1
Growth Habit
Upright
Winter Hardiness
Zone 6

Use

For many producers this species would be best utilized as a forage crop since research consistently determine its ability to rival oats as the highest quality forage of all cereal crops. Winter barley would be a good species to blend with other winter cereals in a mixture to increase the overall forage quality as they begin to mature in the spring. Utilized as a winter annual, barley can grow a deep fibrous rooting system reach over 6' into the soil profile compared to spring barley which has a much shallower root systems. Barley roots support mycorrhizal fungi colonies and would be a great choice for reclaiming overworked, poor, eroded soils.

Nitrogen Fixing Potential
N/A
N Scavenge
8
Dry Matter
6,000-12,000
Lasting Residue
8
Erosion Control
7
Traffic Bearing
5
Grazing Potential
10
Forage Harvest
10
Root Type
Deep Fibrous
Soil Builder
8
Cash Crop Interseeding
7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Advantages

Barley has relatively low water usage compared to other cover crop species, especially during earlier growth stages. Under poor fertility conditions, barley would be a good choice and can help render P & K available for your next crop. Barley provides a good feed quality grain that can be harvested 2-3 weeks earlier than wheat which then allows your double crop/cover to be planted sooner. Compared to oats, barley produces more tillers and vegetation that will remain erect longer after termination. Carbohydrates known as monosaccharides are excrete through the roots to feed the soil biology and barley has been observed to release more monosaccharides than even alfalfa.

Subsoiler
5
Surface Compaction
8
Rendering P & K
5
Traffic Bearing
5
Nematode Control
3
Disease Control
5
Allelopathic Effect
8
Weed Control
8
Short Growth Time
10

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Disadvantages

Winter barleys aren't as consistent at overwintering as wheat, triticale or rye and will require an earlier planting date to insure a higher stand success rate. Disease and pests can be a moderate problem associated with barley crops and when used in rotation with other susceptible crop species. Disease is more of a problem in earlier plantings, cool wet soils or hot conditions with high humidity. In high N conditions, lodging can be a serious concern if growing the barley for grain production. Be sure to kill barley 10-14 days before planting a crop or when planting a high N demanding crop terminate the barley before it reaches 9-12".

Weed Potential
3
Potential Insect/Nematode Risk
6
Crop Disease Risk
6
Effect Cash Crop
5
Ease of Establishment
1
Ease of Till-Kill
6
Ease of Chem-Kill
1
Ease of Mow-Kill
1

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Planting

Be sure to apply your winter barley early enough that it can produce sufficient fall root growth to increase its winter survival. Therefore we wouldn't recommend pushing planting dates as late as winter wheat, triticale or rye. Young plants can commonly withstand winter temperatures dipping down to 17F before they are well established. Barley can be planted at varying depths but shallower planting depths will speed emergence, which also reduces the risk of root rot. Disease carryover from wheat can be a concern with this species. If planting early in the fall and large amounts of biomass are produced, we would encourage some light grazing to control above ground biomass to within 4-6" to increase winter survival.

Ideal Planting Time
Fall: Sept. - Early Oct.
Ideal Planting Depth
3/4 - 2"
Min Germination Temp(F)
38
Drilled Seeding Rate (lb./A)
50-100
Broadcast Seeding Rate (lb./A)
60-100
Reseeding Potential
Possible

Tolerance

Barley has the highest salinity and high ph tolerance of all cereal crops. Barley is much better utilized in basic soils than other cereal crops but will suffer in soils with a pH lower than 6.0. Though cool, dry conditions in a well drained fertilize soil are ideal, barley has the ability to grow in a wide array of soil conditions. Soils that are poorly drained or have excessive moisture will really cause barley to suffer become more prone to disease issues.

Heat
7
Drought
8
Shade
5
Wet Soil Tolerance
3
Low Fertility
9
pH
6.0-8.5

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent