Spring Oats: Hayden

$0.68 per lb.

Bulk Discount Pricing

2 - 9 lbs.
$0.61 / lb.
10 - 19 lbs.
$0.54 / lb.
20 - 29 lbs.
$0.47 / lb.
30 - 39 lbs.
$0.41 / lb.
40 - 49 lbs.
$0.34 / lb.
50+ lbs.
$0.27 / lb.

Rapid growth aids in stabilizing disturbed or bare soil from environmental conditions. Oats can be easily chemically terminated and fall plantings commonly winterkill. Residue from oats suppress winter annuals and protect the soil throughout the winter and will decompose rapidly in the spring. Allelopathic chemicals released by the decomposing residue suppress weed germination for a few weeks. Oats high quality forage is more palatable than rye or wheat. Also, oat is less prone to insect problems than either wheat or barley. Winter oats have been shown to greatly reduce take-all of wheat.

Basic Info

Maturity
June-July
Seeds/lb
15,000
C/N Ratio
Young 20-30:1 Straw 80:1
Growth Habit
Upright
Winter Hardiness
Zone 7

Use

Oat is a cool season, annual grass species that can grow between 24-60" tall. Fall planted oats are an excellent choice as a nurse crop for legumes or other slow establishing species. When grown above winter zone 7, winterkill can be expected. The winterkill residue increases the winter survival of slower establishing species by shielding the winter environment. Oat residue also aids in establishing slower species by suppressing weeds through allelopathic effect and competition. Oats are commonly grown for high quality grazing and forage production. With dense fibrous roots reaching 33-77" into the soil profile, oats can produce a mellow seed bed for the proceeding crop.

Nitrogen Fixing Potential
N/A
N Scavenge
7
Dry Matter
2,000-10,000
Lasting Residue
6
Erosion Control
7
Traffic Bearing
5
Grazing Potential
10
Forage Harvest
10
Root Type
Fibrous
Soil Builder
7
Cash Crop Interseeding
7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Advantages

Rapid growth aids in stabilizing disturbed or bare soil from environmental conditions. Oats can be easily chemically terminated and fall plantings commonly winterkill. Residue from oats suppress winter annuals and protect the soil throughout the winter and will decompose rapidly in the spring. Allelopathic chemicals released by the decomposing residue suppress weed germination for a few weeks. Oats high quality forage is more palatable than rye or wheat. Also, oat is less prone to insect problems than either wheat or barley. Winter oats have been shown to greatly reduce take-all of wheat.

Subsoiler
3
Surface Compaction
7
Rendering P & K
5
Traffic Bearing
5
Nematode Control
1
Disease Control
5
Allelopathic Effect
8
Weed Control
10
Short Growth Time
10

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Disadvantages

Oats are the least winter hardy and drought resistant of all small grain species. Though not winter hardy, oats are utilized to fulfill unique, key roles in cover crop mixtures. Oats produce less tillers than barley, so more seed is required to obtain the same amount of ground cover. Oat roots are described as not being very effective at breaking up compacted soils at depth. Of all the small grain species, oats require the most soil moisture which could deplete soil moisture for subsequent crops in dry conditions. Over grazing can easily deplete a stand and potassium levels in the forage should be monitored when fed to milking cows for possible metabolic problems.

Weed Potential
1
Potential Insect/Nematode Risk
5
Crop Disease Risk
3
Effect Cash Crop
4
Ease of Establishment
1
Ease of Till-Kill
3
Ease of Chem-Kill
1
Ease of Mow-Kill
7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Planting

Broadcasting a uniform stand can prove to be difficult due to the seeds light weight and high air resistance. Drilling is the most recommended application method but broadcasting can be effective. Oats can be sown in the spring or fall depending on intended use. Planting in the fall provides a nurse crop, nutrient scavenger, forage and winterkilled residue. While a spring planted oat can be utilized for extra weed suppression, residue or forage. Fall planting a month before the first frost date may produce between 2,000-4,000 lbs/A of biomass. If planting as a nurse crop sow 1-2 bushel per acre. If a thick soil protecting cover is desired then sow 3-4 bushel per acre. A spring planting of oats will produce significantly more biomass, up to 8,000 lbs/A. Shallow seeding under moist soil conditions, will speed emergence and lessen the risk of root rot.

Ideal Planting Time
August - SeptemberMarch - April
Ideal Planting Depth
1/2 - 1 1/2"
Min Germination Temp(F)
38
Drilled Seeding Rate (lb./A)
80-110
Broadcast Seeding Rate (lb./A)
110-140
Reseeding Potential
Possible

Tolerance

Oat grows best in cool, moist environments, with soils that are moderately fertile. This species has the potential to be grown on a wide range of soils and can tolerate a wider pH range then wheat or barley. Though oat has a fair salinity tolerance, it's still less tolerant than barley. Hot, dry weather conditions will really cause oats to struggle. Oats can't tolerate cold or waterlogged soils as well as rye but oats will fair better under these conditions then barley. Be sure to wait at least two weeks after termination before planting a cash crop after oats to minimize any negative effects from allelopathic chemicals that are excreted during decomposition. Oat is one of the most sensitive cover crop species to residual herbicide damage.

Heat
5
Drought
3
Shade
5
Wet Soil Tolerance
5
Low Fertility
5
pH
4.5-7.5

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent