BMR Sweet Forever Sorghum Sudan

BMR Sweet Forever Sorghum Sudan

$2.78 per lb.

Bulk Discount Pricing

2 - 9 lbs.
$2.50 / lb.
10 - 19 lbs.
$2.22 / lb.
20 - 29 lbs.
$1.95 / lb.
30 - 39 lbs.
$1.67 / lb.
40 - 49 lbs.
$1.39 / lb.
50+ lbs.
$1.11 / lb.

The dense rooting system associated with this species, can really aid in breaking up and penetrating compacted soils. Nematode suppression is achieved because this species is a poor host for many nematodes and nematicidal chemical compounds are excreted by the plant through its roots. Mowing when the plants are 3-4 ft tall has been shown to stimulate root growth to expand 5-8 times as dense and penetrate twice as deep. Sorgoleone is powerful root exudate released by the plant, which even in low concentrations has proven to be more effective than commercial herbicides in weed control. This chemical can be released just five days after germination but is greatly released when chemically killed, with the effects lasting for weeks. Under ideal conditions, forage can be harvested within 60 days after planting. If you leave 6-8″ of growth from the first harvest then you could expect a second cutting 30 days later. There are sterile cultivars available to eliminate weed risk potential.

Basic Info

Maturity
90-100 days after planting
Seeds/lb
18,000
C/N Ratio
50:1
Growth Habit
Upright
Winter Hardiness
Not Frost Tolerant

Use

Sorghum-sudangrass is a rapid growing and very versatile, summer annual species with a very large, penetrating root system. The brown midrib (BMR) is a genetic mutation that results in a forage with a reduced lignin content, increased protein content and higher palatability than non-BMR sorghum-sudangrass varieties. Rate of animal gains are significantly increased when animals graze BMR varieties. Sorghum-sudangrass has a larger stem, less leaf area and produces more biomass than sudangrass. This species can produce more OM/A at a lower cost than any other cover crop species being utilized. During drought conditions sorghum-sudangrass has the greatest potential to be utilized for an emergency forage crop. Mowing or grazing only encourages more tillering and stimulates root growth, which aids in getting more carbon into the soil profile therefore build soil structure and OM.

Nitrogen Fixing Potential
NA
N Scavenge
10
Dry Matter
8,000-10,000
Lasting Residue
8
Erosion Control
10
Traffic Bearing
5
Grazing Potential
8
Forage Harvest
10
Root Type
Deep, Dense Fiborous
Soil Builder
10
Cash Crop Interseeding
1

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Advantages

The dense rooting system associated with this species, can really aid in breaking up and penetrating compacted soils. Nematode suppression is achieved because this species is a poor host for many nematodes and nematicidal chemical compounds are excreted by the plant through its roots. Mowing when the plants are 3-4 ft tall has been shown to stimulate root growth to expand 5-8 times as dense and penetrate twice as deep. Sorgoleone is powerful root exudate released by the plant, which even in low concentrations has proven to be more effective than commercial herbicides in weed control. This chemical can be released just five days after germination but is greatly released when chemically killed, with the effects lasting for weeks. Under ideal conditions, forage can be harvested within 60 days after planting. If you leave 6-8" of growth from the first harvest then you could expect a second cutting 30 days later. There are sterile cultivars available to eliminate weed risk potential.

Subsoiler
10
Surface Compaction
6
Rendering P & K
5
Traffic Bearing
5
Nematode Control
8
Disease Control
7
Allelopathic Effect
10
Weed Control
10
Short Growth Time
10

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Disadvantages

In BMR varieties, the reduced lignin in the plant structure increases the potential for lodging, reduces stem strength and cause a yield drag on seed production. Proper management is vital for this species when being utilized as a forage, to protect the welfare of the animals. If you are grazing, find cultivars that are known to produce low amounts of dhurrin because this is the chemical that is responsible for prussic acid. High amounts of prussic acid can be lethal to livestock and is a major concern when the forage is small, stressed or during the first hard frost event. Don't allow the animals to graze the forage until the forage has reached 18-36" in height. For the first hard frost event, no grazing or forage harvesting should occur until a week after the exposure because this releases a large flush of prussic acid and it will need a short time to dissipate from the forage. During drought conditions prussic acid could be a concern but you really need to watch for nitrate toxicity in the forage. The thick stems associated with this species, can be very difficult to dry down for hay production. The large amounts of high carbon residue needs to be managed properly to reduce the risk of N tie-up.

Weed Potential
5
Potential Insect/Nematode Risk
3
Crop Disease Risk
1
Effect Cash Crop
7
Ease of Establishment
1
Ease of Till-Kill
1
Ease of Chem-Kill
5
Ease of Mow-Kill
7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Planting

Ideal Planting Time
June - early August
Ideal Planting Depth
1/2 - 1 1/2"
Min Germination Temp(F)
65
Drilled Seeding Rate (lb./A)
15 - 30
Broadcast Seeding Rate (lb./A)
35 - 50
Reseeding Potential
Possible

Tolerance

Sorghum-sudangrass will grow best is a well drained, fertile soil with hot, moist weather patterns. Soils from poorly drained to excessively drained and low fertility can support this species but with reduced results. This species excellent drought and heat tolerance can be partially attributed to the fact that it can go dormant until the weather conditions become more favorable for further growth. Supplemental N is highly suggested at 75-100 lbs/A to achieve sufficient growth but this needs to be watched to insure that the nitrate levels are not excessive in the forage. When compared to corn its able to take on dry weather conditions better because it has twice as many secondary roots and supports half the leaf area. Sorghum-sudangrass doesn't have much tolerance for shade, ponding or flooding and has zero tolerance for frost.

Heat
10
Drought
10
Shade
4
Wet Soil Tolerance
4
Low Fertility
4
pH
6 - 7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent