sub_clover_small

Subterranean Clover: Dalkeith

$6.63 per lb.

Out of stock

Bulk Discount Pricing

2 - 9 lbs.
$5.96 / lb.
10 - 19 lbs.
$5.30 / lb.
20 - 29 lbs.
$4.64 / lb.
30 - 39 lbs.
$3.97 / lb.
40 - 49 lbs.
$3.31 / lb.
50+ lbs.
$2.65 / lb.

Compared to vetch, sub clover is more shade tolerant and will produce a denser, less viney canopy. With the dense canopy and a very strong allelopathic effect, sub clover has been observed to be even more effective at weed control than commercial herbicides. The potential for early, high N production with a low C:N ratio, can render a large amount of available N for a corn crop. This organic N has been shown to produce higher grain yields than even 250 lbs/N/A of commercial applied N. There are no major diseases that are known to hamper this species production. Sub clover has proven to be a preferred nesting grounds for many benefical insects. For those that wish to graze sub clover, there has never been a documented case of bloat in sheep or cattle, even when grazing in pure stands.

Basic Info

Maturity
April-June
Seeds/lb
70,000
C/N Ratio
13:1
Growth Habit
Prostrate
Winter Hardiness
Zone 7

Use

Subterranean clover is a cool season annual legume, that produces a thick, low profile canopy reaching only 6-15" in height. With growth densely covering the soils surface, this enables the plant to be very effective at protecting the soil surface from erosion and weed suppression. Spreading through above ground roots known as stolons, sub clover can fill in gaps within a canopy. Known as a pasture legume, the species provides excellent grazing potential with forage that is very palatable to livestock. This species also shows some real potential at intercropping with crops such as cereal grains where it has been shown to increase yields.

Nitrogen Fixing Potential
10 / 75-200
N Scavenge
3
Dry Matter
3,000-8,500
Lasting Residue
7
Erosion Control
7
Traffic Bearing
7
Grazing Potential
7
Forage Harvest
7
Root Type
Fibrous / Tap root
Soil Builder
7
Cash Crop Interseeding
10

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Advantages

Compared to vetch, sub clover is more shade tolerant and will produce a denser, less viney canopy. With the dense canopy and a very strong allelopathic effect, sub clover has been observed to be even more effective at weed control than commercial herbicides. The potential for early, high N production with a low C:N ratio, can render a large amount of available N for a corn crop. This organic N has been shown to produce higher grain yields than even 250 lbs/N/A of commercial applied N. There are no major diseases that are known to hamper this species production. Sub clover has proven to be a preferred nesting grounds for many benefical insects. For those that wish to graze sub clover, there has never been a documented case of bloat in sheep or cattle, even when grazing in pure stands.

Subsoiler
1
Surface Compaction
5
Rendering P & K
3
Traffic Bearing
7
Nematode Control
3
Disease Control
3
Allelopathic Effect
7
Weed Control
10
Short Growth Time
7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Disadvantages

The density of its canopy could prove to be difficult for no-till planters so extra management would be needed to insure a successful planting. Hard seed is more prominent when the parent plants experience dry weather and these seeds can stay viable for years in the soil. Termination can prove to be difficult because the species is tolerate of many herbicides such as glyphosate but paraquat has shown 100% control when sprayed in May. If the weather conditions are dry in the spring, sub clover can deplete soil moisture and above ground biomass should be grazed heavily to minimize any further water loss. For sheep producers, be sure to know the variety planting and its potential for estrogen production because this can cause issues in ewes.

Weed Potential
5
Potential Insect/Nematode Risk
9
Crop Disease Risk
5
Effect Cash Crop
5
Ease of Establishment
1
Ease of Till-Kill
5
Ease of Chem-Kill
6
Ease of Mow-Kill
10

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Planting

If your winter zone allows, best results for sub clover will be obtained when planted in late summer/early fall and earlier plantings will likely result in more spring biomass production. If winterkill is a concern be sure to grow with a nurse crop. Varieties can vary greatly in maturity from 85-130 days. Initial growth will be slower than crimson clover but faster than white clover. Broadcast seeding will lead to the best dispersion and highest productivity. Overseeding into a pasture is possible and will be more successful if the animals are utilized to incorporate the seed in the soil profile. If desired and managed correctly, sub clover can persist for many years.

Ideal Planting Time
September - Mid October
Ideal Planting Depth
1/4 - 1/2"
Min Germination Temp(F)
38
Drilled Seeding Rate (lb./A)
10-20
Broadcast Seeding Rate (lb./A)
20-30
Reseeding Potential
Possible

Tolerance

With a tolerance for low to moderate fertility levels and acidic soils, sub clover could be a good option for poorer soils. If fertility and pH are low, you should watch for deficiencies in P, K and Mo and supplement as needed. Hot, dry summers can limit growth but this species will still thrive because it will have already completed its live cycle by this time. Sub clover doesn't tolerate poorly drained soils. Growth will occur between 41-90 F and tolerates close grazing. Once established seedlings can survive down to 10 F but soil heaving will be a serious threat for smaller plants.

Heat
5
Drought
7
Shade
8
Wet Soil Tolerance
5
Low Fertility
10
pH
4.5-8.2

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent