Yellow Blossom Sweet Clover w/ Exceed PreCoat OMRI

$4.88 per lb.

Bulk Discount Pricing

2 - 9 lbs.
$4.39 / lb.
10 - 19 lbs.
$3.90 / lb.
20 - 29 lbs.
$3.41 / lb.
30 - 39 lbs.
$2.92 / lb.
40 - 49 lbs.
$2.44 / lb.
50+ lbs.
$1.95 / lb.

Sweet clovers warm weather biomass production is only rivaled by alfalfa of all forage legumes. With careful management, sweet clover provides an excellent forage for livestock. Sweet clovers first year of biomass reaches 18-24″ tall but provides forage of equivalent quality and palatability as alfalfa. With proper management, the second years growth can reach 5′ tall but the forage consist lower quality, stemmy vegetation. Grazing and/or haying the second year forage should not allow crop height to exceed 2′, to preserve forage quality. Sweet clover residue release allelopathic chemicals during decomposition which are known to suppress various common weed species such as kochia.

Basic Info

Maturity
May-July
Seeds/lb
174,200
C/N Ratio
12-23:1
Growth Habit
Upright w/ multiple branches
Winter Hardiness
Zone 4

Use

Sweet Clover is an extremely versatile, cool-season legume which historically was one of the most utilized green manure crops in the Midwest. We carry a biennial yellow sweet clover because of its superior winter hardiness and versatility. Sweet clover has the potential to produce up to 100 lb/A of N during the first season and 200 lb/A N over its lifespan. With sweet clovers extensive rooting system potentially penetrating down 5' into the soil profile and the ability to render P, K and other nutrients available, this makes it an excellent choice for rejuvenating poor and thin soils. This species provides valuable benefits to a wide array of wildlife species from birds to large mammals. Pollinators swarm to sweet clover during its second growing season to collect pollen from its extensive flowering period which occurs May thru August.

Nitrogen Fixing Potential
10 / 100-200
N Scavenge
3
Dry Matter
3,000-5,000
Lasting Residue
7
Erosion Control
8
Traffic Bearing
6
Grazing Potential
8
Forage Harvest
8
Root Type
Deep Tap root
Soil Builder
10
Cash Crop Interseeding
7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Advantages

Sweet clovers warm weather biomass production is only rivaled by alfalfa of all forage legumes. With careful management, sweet clover provides an excellent forage for livestock. Sweet clovers first year of biomass reaches 18-24" tall but provides forage of equivalent quality and palatability as alfalfa. With proper management, the second years growth can reach 5' tall but the forage consist lower quality, stemmy vegetation. Grazing and/or haying the second year forage should not allow crop height to exceed 2', to preserve forage quality. Sweet clover residue release allelopathic chemicals during decomposition which are known to suppress various common weed species such as kochia.

Subsoiler
10
Surface Compaction
10
Rendering P & K
10
Traffic Bearing
6
Nematode Control
3
Disease Control
5
Allelopathic Effect
8
Weed Control
5
Short Growth Time
3

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Disadvantages

Though selective breeding has reduced coumarin levels, it's still the biggest concern associated with sweet clover forage. Coumarin in spoiled or moldy forage is transformed into a chemical form which acts as an anti-coagulant, causing harm or potentially death to cattle. A bloat risk is associated with sweet clover, which is slightly less than alfalfa. Sweet clover has a small percentage of hard seed which can lay dormant for 20 years. Though initial sweet clover growth is slow, it can overcome a cereal companion crop in poor stands or wet soils. Second year vegetation produces very woody stems which can be hard to manage if growth isn't controlled. Under dry conditions, sweet clovers extensive roots can deplete soil moisture but its residue aids snow capture as well as retaining surface moisture.

Weed Potential
9
Potential Insect/Nematode Risk
7
Crop Disease Risk
1
Effect Cash Crop
7
Ease of Establishment
1
Ease of Till-Kill
1
Ease of Chem-Kill
1
Ease of Mow-Kill
3

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Planting

Sweet clover can be frost seeded or established in the fall but with fall plantings it's critical to allow for enough root development to protect against soil heaving. A shallow planting depth will be critical for successful stand establishment. Therefore, the deepest suggested planting depth should be reserved for only dry, sandy soils. If planting with a cereal nurse/cash crop apply 4-6 lbs of clover. If frostseeding into a cereal crop, apply 10 lbs before rapid stem elongation to allow enough growth before shading becomes a threat. Some producers have overseeded sweet clover into 6-18" standing corn but results can be variable, which is mostly attributed to sunlight.

Ideal Planting Time
August - SeptemberDecember - March
Ideal Planting Depth
1/4 - 1/2"
Min Germination Temp(F)
42
Drilled Seeding Rate (lb./A)
8-10
Broadcast Seeding Rate (lb./A)
10-15
Reseeding Potential
High

Tolerance

Sweet clover is an extremely hardy species that can withstand a large spectrum of adversity including low fertility, salinity, lack of moisture and high pH. Sweet clover is known as the most drought tolerant forage legume because performance can peak with just 12-20" of rainfall a year but can tolerate as little as 9". Sweet clover thrives in a fertile loam soil with a neutral pH, much like alfalfa but easily performs alfalfa in dry environments. Sweet clover can be grown in soils from heavy clay to gravely sand but won't perform in poorly drained soils. Stress from extensive grazing or haying should be avoided during the first season if a deep rooted, over wintering cover is desired. Sweet clover will withstand flooding up to two weeks if dormant but will die very quickly if actively growing. A low shade tolerances leads to mixed interplanting results.

Heat
8
Drought
10
Shade
3
Wet Soil Tolerance
3
Low Fertility
10
pH
6.0-8.0

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent