Persian Clover

$5.38 per lb.

Bulk Discount Pricing

2 - 9 lbs.
$4.84 / lb.
10 - 19 lbs.
$4.30 / lb.
20 - 29 lbs.
$3.77 / lb.
30 - 39 lbs.
$3.23 / lb.
40 - 49 lbs.
$2.69 / lb.
50+ lbs.
$2.15 / lb.

Ever aspect of this plant supports its reputation for excellent forage quality. Mature stems are soft, hollow and have thin structural plant cell walls, leading it to be more digestible than red clover or alfalfa. Some common forage tests boast CP 16-21% and IVDMD 63-78%. Not to mention, studies have show persian clover to be more palatable than rape, alfalfa, fescue or perennial ryegrass. High productivity during March- April, provides excellent regrowth potential following grazing or the ability to support two spring hay cuttings. Given the right circumstances, one could expect persian clover to naturally reseed and be redistributed by wind/water via its very mobile, light weight, seed pods. Spring flowers are known to also attract flower flies, which larva are a leading predator of aphids.

Basic Info

Maturity
Late May- Early July
Seeds/lb
140,000
C/N Ratio
15-25:1
Growth Habit
Prostrate
Winter Hardiness
Zone 7B

Use

Forage quality and palatability is what really sets this clover above its peers. Persian clover is most utilized for grazing but also makes an excellent silage or hay crop. If you are interested in haying expect to only yield 1-2 tons/A, with cutting intervals taking 6-9 weeks. Making a powerful green manure crop for the south, one could expect heavy nodulation. Small lavender flowers will begin to bloom in the spring around 120-140 days after germination. The flowers not only attract bountiful beneficial insects but the flowers themselves are very palatable to herbivores. Persian clover is highly attractive to deer, in fact its been reported floral pheromones can attract deer from over 5 miles away.

Nitrogen Fixing Potential
9 / 80-100
N Scavenge
5
Dry Matter
2,000-4,000
Lasting Residue
3
Erosion Control
8
Traffic Bearing
3
Grazing Potential
9
Forage Harvest
10
Root Type
Branching Taproot
Soil Builder
3
Cash Crop Interseeding
7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Advantages

Ever aspect of this plant supports its reputation for excellent forage quality. Mature stems are soft, hollow and have thin structural plant cell walls, leading it to be more digestible than red clover or alfalfa. Some common forage tests boast CP 16-21% and IVDMD 63-78%. Not to mention, studies have show persian clover to be more palatable than rape, alfalfa, fescue or perennial ryegrass. High productivity during March- April, provides excellent regrowth potential following grazing or the ability to support two spring hay cuttings. Given the right circumstances, one could expect persian clover to naturally reseed and be redistributed by wind/water via its very mobile, light weight, seed pods. Spring flowers are known to also attract flower flies, which larva are a leading predator of aphids.

Subsoiler
3
Surface Compaction
5
Rendering P & K
5
Traffic Bearing
3
Nematode Control
1
Disease Control
7
Allelopathic Effect
3
Weed Control
7
Short Growth Time
9

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Disadvantages

Bloat is a serious concern for cattle consuming large quantities of biomass but this hasn't been observed in sheep. To reduce bloat risk simply interseed or sow with other grass species, giving cattle the ability to balance their intake. If you continuous graze an interseeded pasture and would like persian to persist then its recommended you reduce stocking rates during flowering because animals find the flower to be very palatable. Persian clover has also been associated with some livestock health disorders such as: enterotoxaemia (pulpy kidney), photosensitisation sometimes, urinary calculi (clover stones) incidence may increase in sheep, and occasional red gut in sheep. Establishment may prove to be more difficult than red or white clover because persian doesn't compete very well during establishment with other established species. If maximum tonnage is your goal then berseem would make a more suitable clover. Some cultivars have hard seed which may be a negative if you desire limited persistence in your field.

Weed Potential
5
Potential Insect/Nematode Risk
5
Crop Disease Risk
3
Effect Cash Crop
3
Ease of Establishment
7
Ease of Till-Kill
3
Ease of Chem-Kill
3
Ease of Mow-Kill
6

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Planting

Most commonly persian clover is applied during mid to late fall in the southern US as a winter annual. Planting during this time when soil temps are 50F, will result in a rapid emergence within 4-5 days. Providing sufficient growth leading into the winter, followed a burst of production in the early spring. Broadcasting is a very successful application method utilized to interseed into an established pasture. If interseeding into a pasture, we would encourage grazing the current plant material down enough to allow the clover to compete. Its common to seed persian clover with a winter annual grass to provide an excellent ration for livestock. Do this will encourage the persian clover to grow more erect and produce more total biomass. Persian is an excellent choice to plant in heavy river bottom soils, especially those utilized for rice production.

Ideal Planting Time
Early SpringSept - October
Ideal Planting Depth
1/5 - 1/4"
Min Germination Temp(F)
40
Drilled Seeding Rate (lb./A)
4-6
Broadcast Seeding Rate (lb./A)
6-7
Reseeding Potential
Very Possible

Tolerance

Persian clover is best adapted for fertile, poorly drained, heavy clayloam soils. This clover can only be utilized as a winter annual where temperatures don't drop below 10F otherwise it will likely winterkill. With moderate salinity tolerance, it preforms better than subterranean clover under those conditions. Drought tolerance is considered to be average for a similar cool season legume but persian notably more tolerant than berseem clover. Though drought and/or high temperatures during establishment will surely lead to a poor stand though. To maintain a good stand of clover after grazing, don't allow livestock to consume below 2" of plant material and rotate animals regularly to prevent overgrazing.

Heat
6
Drought
7
Shade
5
Wet Soil Tolerance
10
Low Fertility
5
pH
5-9

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent