berseem_small

Berseem Clover: Balady

$5.38 per lb.

Bulk Discount Pricing

2 - 9 lbs.
$4.84 / lb.
10 - 19 lbs.
$4.30 / lb.
20 - 29 lbs.
$3.77 / lb.
30 - 39 lbs.
$3.23 / lb.
40 - 49 lbs.
$2.69 / lb.
50+ lbs.
$2.15 / lb.

Berseem clover produces a non-bloating, high quality forage, that’s more palatable than alfalfa. Berseem forage has been observed to maintain a CP content of 28-30% throughout harvesting regiments, which is slightly higher than crimson clover or alfalfa. Berseem clover has low water requirements and can provide strong biomass recovery after being mowed. A rapidly, consistent stand can be achieved because germination can occur in just 7 days and minimal hard seed counts. This clover produces flowers which are self-sterile so reseeding is not a concern. These flowers do provide a great pollen source, which is highly sought after by honeybees. Berseem can be controlled easily with glyphosate or when planted in colder regions will winterkill. With good shade tolerance, this species can be utilized for interseeding into crop systems or forage mixtures.

Basic Info

Maturity
Late May-June
Seeds/lb
134,000
C/N Ratio
18-23:1
Growth Habit
Upright
Winter Hardiness
Zone 8

Use

Berseem clover is commonly grown as a summer annual in areas with cool, wet summers or as a winter annual in areas which experience long, warm winters with minimal frosts. Spring planted berseem can produce rapid, competitive growth. Berseem is predominately utilized for forage production, of which is comparable to alfalfa but will grow better in tight, wet soils. Producing haylage is the most common harvesting method because the plant biomass can be difficult to dry. Within 60 days, the forage will be ready to harvest after it reaches 16-20" tall and before it begins to bloom. After the first cutting, mowing ever 30 days encourages biomass and N production.

Nitrogen Fixing Potential
10 / 75-200
N Scavenge
7
Dry Matter
3.500-8,000
Lasting Residue
5
Erosion Control
7
Traffic Bearing
3
Grazing Potential
10
Forage Harvest
10
Root Type
Shallow Taproot
Soil Builder
7
Cash Crop Interseeding
5

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Advantages

Berseem clover produces a non-bloating, high quality forage, that's more palatable than alfalfa. Berseem forage has been observed to maintain a CP content of 28-30% throughout harvesting regiments, which is slightly higher than crimson clover or alfalfa. Berseem clover has low water requirements and can provide strong biomass recovery after being mowed. A rapidly, consistent stand can be achieved because germination can occur in just 7 days and minimal hard seed counts. This clover produces flowers which are self-sterile so reseeding is not a concern. These flowers do provide a great pollen source, which is highly sought after by honeybees. Berseem can be controlled easily with glyphosate or when planted in colder regions will winterkill. With good shade tolerance, this species can be utilized for interseeding into crop systems or forage mixtures.

Subsoiler
3
Surface Compaction
7
Rendering P & K
7
Traffic Bearing
3
Nematode Control
1
Disease Control
1
Allelopathic Effect
3
Weed Control
7
Short Growth Time
7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Disadvantages

Known as being the least winter hardy of all the true annual clovers, berseem will surely winter kill in zone 7 or colder. The rooting system is major limiting factor for this species because its tap root predominately only reaches 6-8" into the soil profile. With such a shallow rooting system, this limits its ability to be grown in sandy or dry growing conditions. Grazing can limit berseems sustainability in a growing season because the growing point is above the soil profile, which can be trampled by livestock. Therefore if your grazing and want to maintain a stand, berseem clover should be grazed to maintain a height which suppresses erect vegetation.

Weed Potential
1
Potential Insect/Nematode Risk
5
Crop Disease Risk
3
Effect Cash Crop
1
Ease of Establishment
1
Ease of Till-Kill
3
Ease of Chem-Kill
4
Ease of Mow-Kill
8

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Planting

Seed bed requirements are very similar to alfalfa, in which a dry, loose soil will surely suppress germination success. Though berseem can germinate in moderately dry soil surface conditions, a shot of moisture after planting will greatly increase stand success. Planting when the air temperatures are commonly in the low 40's, will increase its winter survival. With adequate moisture, an August planting of berseem can achieve tremendous amounts of growth before winterkilling. If you are looking for a spring forage crop, berseem and spring oats/barley can produce significantly more quality tonnage than when planted alone. Berseem clover can be a very viable option to interested into a grain crop which allows some light to establish and sustain.

Ideal Planting Time
Early Spring or Early Fall
Ideal Planting Depth
1/4 - 1"
Min Germination Temp(F)
42
Drilled Seeding Rate (lb./A)
8 - 15
Broadcast Seeding Rate (lb./A)
15 - 20
Reseeding Potential
Unlikely

Tolerance

Berseem clover can grow in a wide range of soils but will thrive in fertile, loam to clay soils. Growth in sandy soils is limited due to its shallow rooting system but it can withstand short periods of drought or waterlogging. Berseem is less drought tolerant than alfalfa but will perform better in high moisture and high alkaline soils. This clover species will perform better in poorly drained soil better than most other legumes. Fertility requirements are similar to that of alfalfa and low B levels can really limit growth. Salinity tolerance is greater than alfalfa or red clover. Berseem will tolerate temperatures as low as 24F with no damage but winterkills when temperatures stay below 20F.

Heat
7
Drought
5
Shade
7
Wet Soil Tolerance
5
Low Fertility
5
pH
6 - 7.8

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent