Red Clover

Red Clover: Medium

$4.88 per lb.

Bulk Discount Pricing

2 - 9 lbs.
$4.39 / lb.
10 - 19 lbs.
$3.90 / lb.
20 - 29 lbs.
$3.41 / lb.
30 - 39 lbs.
$2.92 / lb.
40 - 49 lbs.
$2.44 / lb.
50+ lbs.
$1.95 / lb.

With similar forage yields, crude protein and better digestibility when compared to alfalfa, red clover can be an excellent forage alternative to add to your operation. You can harvest your first cutting 60-70 days after a spring seeding and on every 30-35 day intervals after initial harvest. With its vigorous spring growth, this clover has the capability of suppressing weeds. Red clover is less invasive than white clover because of its shorter life span and the lack of rhizome or stolon rooting structures. It’s deep taproot can extend up to 3ft into the soil profile and finer rooting structure in the top 5″ can really aid in breaking up compacted soils. Red clover flowers are known to attract many pollinator and benefical insect species. If P leaching is a concern, red clover has been observed to leach only 1/3-1/5 the amount of P as ryegrass or radishes.

Basic Info

Maturity
60-70 days
Seeds/lb
184,250
C/N Ratio
15-23:1
Growth Habit
Upright
Winter Hardiness
Zone 4

Use

Red clover is a fast growing, productive biennial or short perennial legume. This legume will grow 12-36" in height and has the potential to be harvested for forage up to three times in the establishment year. Known for its excellent forage value, red clover reaches its peak forage value 5-15 days after first bloom. Red clover is a great species to add into a traditional corn and bean rotation because of its cold tolerance, N production, shade tolerance, late-seeding dates, quick establishment and growth. This clover species is a moderate N producer at around 70-150 lbs/N/A but this N has been shown to be quite readily available to your subsequent crop.

Nitrogen Fixing Potential
8 / 70-150
N Scavenge
5
Dry Matter
2,000-5,000
Lasting Residue
3
Erosion Control
5
Traffic Bearing
4
Grazing Potential
10
Forage Harvest
10
Root Type
Tap root
Soil Builder
7
Cash Crop Interseeding
10

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Advantages

With similar forage yields, crude protein and better digestibility when compared to alfalfa, red clover can be an excellent forage alternative to add to your operation. You can harvest your first cutting 60-70 days after a spring seeding and on every 30-35 day intervals after initial harvest. With its vigorous spring growth, this clover has the capability of suppressing weeds. Red clover is less invasive than white clover because of its shorter life span and the lack of rhizome or stolon rooting structures. It's deep taproot can extend up to 3ft into the soil profile and finer rooting structure in the top 5" can really aid in breaking up compacted soils. Red clover flowers are known to attract many pollinator and benefical insect species. If P leaching is a concern, red clover has been observed to leach only 1/3-1/5 the amount of P as ryegrass or radishes.

Subsoiler
7
Surface Compaction
5
Rendering P & K
7
Traffic Bearing
4
Nematode Control
3
Disease Control
3
Allelopathic Effect
5
Weed Control
6
Short Growth Time
5

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Disadvantages

The biggest issues with red clover comes with its use as a forage source. Sheep producers need to be aware that red clover produces oestrogens, which can interfere with livestock breeding cycles so its forage should not be consumed during the breeding season. Bloat is also a real concern for ruminant animals and should be closely monitored. If the conditions are hot, humid horses could experience slobbers. For hay production, red clover forage can prove difficult to dry especially during poor hay curing weather conditions. Red clover is known to be very susceptible to root rots and foliar diseases, which leads to its short lifespan. Don't expect red clover to spread and fill in vacant space within a field because it grows from the seedlings primary stem. Its upright growth really limits red clover to rotational grazing or forage production when the use for animal production is desired.

Weed Potential
6
Potential Insect/Nematode Risk
7
Crop Disease Risk
3
Effect Cash Crop
1
Ease of Establishment
3
Ease of Till-Kill
3
Ease of Chem-Kill
6
Ease of Mow-Kill
8

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Planting

With such a large planting window, versatility of plant methods and great shade tolerance, red clover can be easily incorporated into many operations. Red clover can be easily established by broadcast or interseeding into many crop rotations. If sowing into a corn or soybean field, broadcast at physiological maturity in corn and leaf yellowing in soybeans. Red clover can be intercropped in corn by broadcasting clover when corn is 12" tall and six weeks since pre-emergence herbicide application . Red clover can be easily interseeded or frost seeded into small grain crops as well. Emergence occurs in just 7 days which is faster than most other legumes but the seedling growth is still slow. Plant growth occurs between 44-104 F, with the optimum growth temperature between 68-77 F. Biomass production is increased when established with a nurse crop and red clover is very responsive to P and K applications especially in poor fertility soils.

Ideal Planting Time
Late Summer - Early Spring
Ideal Planting Depth
1/4 - 1/2"
Min Germination Temp(F)
41
Drilled Seeding Rate (lb./A)
8-10
Broadcast Seeding Rate (lb./A)
10-15
Reseeding Potential
Possible

Tolerance

Red clover grows best in hot, temperate climates where moisture is sufficient. With the ability to grow on a wide array of soils types, it performs best on soils that are conducive for corn production, especially in cooler environments. Though well drained soils are preferred, red clover is more tolerant of wet, acidic soils than alfalfa. Some flooding or ponding is tolerated but only after establishment and there's a very low tolerance for salinity. Red clover moderate water use, which could consume excess water in a dry spring. Best known for being one of the most cold hardy legumes, red clover has been documented to survive through temperatures as low as -22 F. Winter survival can be improved if the species isn't mowed or grazed up to six weeks before first frost.

Heat
5
Drought
4
Shade
7
Wet Soil Tolerance
4
Low Fertility
4
pH
6-7.6

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent