Crimson Clover: Dixie with Exceed PreCoat OMRI Inoc

$3.50 per lb.

Bulk Discount Pricing

2 - 9 lbs.
$3.15 / lb.
10 - 19 lbs.
$2.80 / lb.
20 - 29 lbs.
$2.45 / lb.
30 - 39 lbs.
$2.10 / lb.
40 - 49 lbs.
$1.75 / lb.
50+ lbs.
$1.40 / lb.

Crimson clovers spring growth can rapidly produce a large amount of biomass. Crimson can grow at lower temperatures better then almost any other clover species. Maturing earlier in the spring than hairy vetch allows this species to reach its maximum N production sooner. Peak N production occurs during flowering around the middle of May when it is induced by 12 hours of daylight. This species grows great in mixes and fits well into a traditional corn/soybean rotation. Even if the clover is winter killed, it still can produce a thick mulch that reduces erosion, increases infiltration and has been shown to inhibit small seeded weed species from germinating. If desired, crimson clover can be utilized in a rotation that would allow it to reseed the field. The deep, red blossoms are 1/2-1″ in length and are renowned for their beauty and nectar production. The flowers attract many pollinators and some very beneficial insects, such as pirate bugs and lady bugs.

Basic Info

Maturity
May or later
Seeds/lb
107,200
C/N Ratio
20:1
Growth Habit
Upright/Semi-Upright
Winter Hardiness
Zone 7

Use

Crimson clover is a very versatile legume cover crop, with exceptional biomass and nitrogen production. This species can be planted as a summer annual in colder regions or a winter annual in warmer regions. A winter annual planting can grow 12-20" tall at maturity and produce similar nitrogen yields as hairy vetch or winter peas. Fall biomass production can be significant enough to reduce soil erosion and out compete weed species better then hairy vetch. It's taproot has the potential to reach a depth of 12-21" and has the ability produce and scavenge residual N. Crimson clover produces an excellent forage crop. Don't cut or graze lower then 3-4" before crimson has reached the early bud stage to ensure good regrowth. Crimson can be successfully sown into an existing, aggressive stand of grass if the seed is lightly incorporated into very short biomass.

Nitrogen Fixing Potential
N8 / 70-130
N Scavenge
5
Dry Matter
3,500-5,500
Lasting Residue
5
Erosion Control
7
Traffic Bearing
3
Grazing Potential
10
Forage Harvest
10
Root Type
Taproot
Soil Builder
7
Cash Crop Interseeding
10

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Advantages

Crimson clovers spring growth can rapidly produce a large amount of biomass. Crimson can grow at lower temperatures better then almost any other clover species. Maturing earlier in the spring than hairy vetch allows this species to reach its maximum N production sooner. Peak N production occurs during flowering around the middle of May when it is induced by 12 hours of daylight. This species grows great in mixes and fits well into a traditional corn/soybean rotation. Even if the clover is winter killed, it still can produce a thick mulch that reduces erosion, increases infiltration and has been shown to inhibit small seeded weed species from germinating. If desired, crimson clover can be utilized in a rotation that would allow it to reseed the field. The deep, red blossoms are 1/2-1" in length and are renowned for their beauty and nectar production. The flowers attract many pollinators and some very beneficial insects, such as pirate bugs and lady bugs.

Subsoiler
3
Surface Compaction
5
Rendering P & K
5
Traffic Bearing
3
Nematode Control
3
Disease Control
5
Allelopathic Effect
3
Weed Control
7
Short Growth Time
5

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Disadvantages

In colder regions, crimson is much more susceptible to winter kill and fungal disease. Winter kill can be greatly reduced when planted into a mix that will help protect it from the harsh weather. The root on this species is just a small taproot and could attract voles into the field. If the clover is winterkilled it will release most of its nitrogen in the spring and not when crop N needs are at peak levels. There is a slight risk for bloat when grazing but this can be reduced by mixing with a grass species. This species of clover is known to be an alternative host to corn earworm. Be sure to know the variety of the crimson seed you purchase, due to differences in the density of the seed coat. A hard seeded variety planted late in the spring will not germinate until the fall.

Weed Potential
5
Potential Insect/Nematode Risk
10
Crop Disease Risk
3
Effect Cash Crop
1
Ease of Establishment
3
Ease of Till-Kill
3
Ease of Chem-Kill
3
Ease of Mow-Kill
3

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Planting

Planting of crimson clover can occur throughout much of the year depending on the farmers goal. Many producers broadcast crimson into soybeans at leaf yellowing or corn when canopy reaches 16-24" in height. When seeding into corn the seed will germinate and the plants wont grow much until the fall when the canopy begins to open up again from senescence. A successful broadcast seeding, is directly correlated to the amount of soil moisture or rain fall that is present after the application. A fall planting should occur 6-8 weeks before the first killing frost date if winterkill is a concern for your area. Emergence will occur within 7-10 days. Planting to early could cause the clover to go to seed and ensure that the cover will not over winter. Crimson can be frost seeded during late winter but this could result in stunted spring growth, poor flowering and lower seed production. Planting with closer row spacing is important to insure canopy closure. Crimson clover isn't the best clover to frost seed into an existing commercial cereal crop.

Ideal Planting Time
August - Septemberor Frost Seeded
Ideal Planting Depth
1/4-1/2"
Min Germination Temp(F)
42
Drilled Seeding Rate (lb./A)
10-20
Broadcast Seeding Rate (lb./A)
22-30
Reseeding Potential
Possible

Tolerance

Crimson clover prefers a well drained soil and will react poorly to a soil that is heavy in clay, waterlogged or has an extreme pH. Crimson does best in areas that average 35" of rain fall a year and doesn't tolerate droughty conditions very well. If deficiencies in P and K or the soil is to acidic, N fixation will be inhibited. Once this species is established it thrives in cool, wet soils. Crimson will only produce a viable seed crop under excellent soil moisture conditions. Mowing is a possible control method if preformed after early bud stage. Cold tolerance is the limiting factor of incorporating crimson clover into colder regions. Crimson can over winter up to the lower part of plant hardiness zone 6. Over wintering can occur north of zone 6 but residue from other species is required for protection from the environment.

Heat
5
Drought
3
Shade
7
Wet Soil Tolerance
3
Low Fertility
5
pH
5.5-7.0

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent