Spring Forage Peas: 4010

$0.98 per lb.

Bulk Discount Pricing

2 - 9 lbs.
$0.88 / lb.
10 - 19 lbs.
$0.78 / lb.
20 - 29 lbs.
$0.69 / lb.
30 - 39 lbs.
$0.59 / lb.
40 - 49 lbs.
$0.49 / lb.
50+ lbs.
$0.39 / lb.

Peas rapid spring growth can be very effective at suppressing weeds. With a N content of 3-4%, peas produce 90-150 lbs/N/A and there are even reports of 300 lbs./N/A. The residue breaks down rapidly, releasing the N quickly. Once established pea can withstand heavy frosts but can easily be killed by herbicide at all growth stages. With no hard seed and ease to kill, peas don’t pose any weed threat. Pest cycles can be broken with peas in your rotation and has been documented to be very effective at reducing take-all disease in wheat.

Basic Info

Maturity
52-100 days
Seeds/lb
3,200
C/N Ratio
Leaf/Root-25:1 or Stem-27-83:1
Growth Habit
Weak Upright Vining
Winter Hardiness
Hard Frost

Use

Spring pea is an annual, cool season legume that can have rapid growth in the spring especially under cool and moist conditions. When compared to winter pea, spring pea has larger seeds, less seeds per pound and is less expensive. Peas produce excellent forage, with high water use efficiency. Be sure to mix peas with an upright structuring plant species to support plant growth. Peas can slightly increase forage yield but will really boost forage quality. Long-term flowering is very attractive to pollinator insects.

Nitrogen Fixing Potential
10 / 90-150
N Scavenge
3
Dry Matter
4,000-5,000
Lasting Residue
3
Erosion Control
7
Traffic Bearing
3
Grazing Potential
8
Forage Harvest
10
Root Type
Fibrous
Soil Builder
5
Cash Crop Interseeding
10

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Advantages

Peas rapid spring growth can be very effective at suppressing weeds. With a N content of 3-4%, peas produce 90-150 lbs/N/A and there are even reports of 300 lbs./N/A. The residue breaks down rapidly, releasing the N quickly. Once established pea can withstand heavy frosts but can easily be killed by herbicide at all growth stages. With no hard seed and ease to kill, peas don't pose any weed threat. Pest cycles can be broken with peas in your rotation and has been documented to be very effective at reducing take-all disease in wheat.

Subsoiler
3
Surface Compaction
7
Rendering P & K
3
Traffic Bearing
3
Nematode Control
5
Disease Control
7
Allelopathic Effect
3
Weed Control
7
Short Growth Time
7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Disadvantages

Peas have a shallow, small rooting system that allows the species to be susceptible to drought and not contribute much to building long-term OM. Weak stems require companion crops to support upward growth and keep biomass off the ground where it's susceptible to rot. Peas can have poor emergence through heavy residue. When other legumes are in the rotation, peas should be approached with caution because peas can enhance disease transfer and is an attractive host to aphids. Poor regrowth after mowing or grazing can be expected, along with the forage being very succulent and hard to dry down.

Weed Potential
1
Potential Insect/Nematode Risk
5
Crop Disease Risk
7
Effect Cash Crop
1
Ease of Establishment
1
Ease of Till-Kill
7
Ease of Chem-Kill
1
Ease of Mow-Kill
1

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Planting

Earlier plantings allow for larger growth which will aid in overwintering and soil protection. Planting early enough to achieve 6-8 inches of above ground growth will allow the roots to develop below the threat of soil heaving. Planting depth should be dependent on moisture in the soil profile but if planting is delayed then the seed should be planted near the surface. If the seed is not planted thick enough then the peas will grow on the ground and be prone to rot. Broadcast is possible but with a larger seed like pea, it's important to incorporate the seed for a better stand. Narrow row spacing will reduce the time for canopy closure. Note that planting peas in warmer soils can make it more susceptible to soil pathogens.

Ideal Planting Time
March - April
Ideal Planting Depth
1 1/2 - 3"
Min Germination Temp(F)
41
Drilled Seeding Rate (lb./A)
50-80
Broadcast Seeding Rate (lb./A)
90-100
Reseeding Potential
Possible

Tolerance

Peas require cool, moist growing conditions and won't tolerate the hot summer heat. This specie requires fertile well drained loam and clayey soils for optimum growth but won't tolerate droughty or poorly drained soils. Soils can have a pH range of 4.2-8.7 with optimum pH at 7.0. Peas really won't tolerate waterlogged or flooded soils. If salinity is an issue in your soil then peas are not suggested. Spring peas can withstand cooler temperatures but the stand can be reduced or killed with a hard frost.

Heat
5
Drought
5
Shade
3
Wet Soil Tolerance
3
Low Fertility
3
pH
6-7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent