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Hairy Vetch: MT

$4.50 per lb.

Bulk Discount Pricing

2 - 9 lbs.
$4.05 / lb.
10 - 19 lbs.
$3.60 / lb.
20 - 29 lbs.
$3.15 / lb.
30 - 39 lbs.
$2.70 / lb.
40 - 49 lbs.
$2.25 / lb.
50+ lbs.
$1.80 / lb.

Hairy vetch is one of the most winter hardy legumes. Being more winter hardy than common vetch, hairy vetch has the potential to withstand temperatures in excess of 5F with no cover. This species is known to have a great rooting system, with a tap root that will extend 1 to 3 feet into the soil profile. This taproot will allow the vetch to thrive even in dry conditions. When hairy vetch is placed into a mix, it can help bring the C:N ratio of the mixture down. This reduces the risk of nitrogen immobilization for the next crop.

Basic Info

Maturity
May-early June
Seeds/lb
12,000
C/N Ratio
15:1
Growth Habit
Climbing Vine
Winter Hardiness
Zone 3-4

Use

Hairy vetch is one of the most versatile legume crops. Hairy vetch can be grown in a monoculture or mixed with a winter cereal and produce a very high quality forage crop. In a monoculture, hairy vetch can produce a high protein content forage at 1.5 to 3.5 tons DM/A. It's very common for producers to grow this specie as a green manure/ N source for their grain crops. If nitrogen production is your primary goal, then you must allow this species to grow at least into May. Nitrogen production can range from 80-200 lbs/A. Hairy vetches vigorous growth in the spring out competes its competition. Attraction of pollinators will occur during flowering from May through early July.

Nitrogen Fixing Potential
100 / 90-200
N Scavenge
3
Dry Matter
2,300-5,000
Lasting Residue
2
Erosion Control
6
Traffic Bearing
3
Grazing Potential
7
Forage Harvest
5
Root Type
Tap root
Soil Builder
7
Cash Crop Interseeding
7

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Advantages

Hairy vetch is one of the most winter hardy legumes. Being more winter hardy than common vetch, hairy vetch has the potential to withstand temperatures in excess of 5F with no cover. This species is known to have a great rooting system, with a tap root that will extend 1 to 3 feet into the soil profile. This taproot will allow the vetch to thrive even in dry conditions. When hairy vetch is placed into a mix, it can help bring the C:N ratio of the mixture down. This reduces the risk of nitrogen immobilization for the next crop.

Subsoiler
6
Surface Compaction
8
Rendering P & K
7
Traffic Bearing
3
Nematode Control
4
Disease Control
6
Allelopathic Effect
6
Weed Control
8
Short Growth Time
2

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Disadvantages

Hairy vetch is not a crop that would planted as a monoculture if your goal is to build organic matter. Due to its low C:N ratio, the plant material readily breaks down after termination. There is a weed risk associated with hairy vetch because of hard seed coats. Seeds that have a hard seed coat can lay dormant in the soil for over five years. Hard seed is especially a problem for producers with cereal grains in their rotation. The hard seed can germinate during the cereal crop rotation and lay down the crop. The hard seed doesn't have a significant effect on a corn-bean rotation. Note that hairy vetch is a vine plant which leads to some issues of entanglement in equipment when harvested as a forage. An application of just glyphosate will be ineffective in controlling a stand of hairy vetch.

Weed Potential
7
Potential Insect/Nematode Risk
6
Crop Disease Risk
3
Effect Cash Crop
1
Ease of Establishment
5
Ease of Till-Kill
3
Ease of Chem-Kill
2
Ease of Mow-Kill
2

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Planting

Hairy vetch is normally drilled or broadcasted in the fall. Many producers broadcast hairy vetch into soybeans at leaf yellowing or corn when the canopy allows 50% of the sunlight to reach the ground. A successful broadcast seeding, is directly correlated to the amount of soil moisture or rain fall that is present after the application. Seeding should occur 30 to 45 days before a killing frost to get a good establishment. Emergence will occur about 14 days after planting. A nurse crop is suggested for establishment because hairy vetch produces low amounts of fall growth. Hairy vetch may be sown in early spring but will produce far less biomass compared to a fall sown stand.

Ideal Planting Time
Early SpringAugust - October
Ideal Planting Depth
1/2 - 1 1/2"
Min Germination Temp(F)
48
Drilled Seeding Rate (lb./A)
15-20
Broadcast Seeding Rate (lb./A)
20-40
Reseeding Potential
Possible

Tolerance

Hairy Vetch is known to grow in a wide array of soil types but is best adapted to a loam or sandy loam soil. This specie tolerates a lower pH and poorly drained soils better than most legumes. Compacted soils will hamper plant establishment and growth. This cool-season legume doesn't tolerate heat or flooding very well. Hairy vetch can be interseeded into an established row crop with great results due to its high shade tolerance. A high drought tolerance, allows hairy vetch to out yield other vetch species during drought years.

Heat
4
Drought
6
Shade
7
Wet Soil Tolerance
4
Low Fertility
5
pH
5.0-8.0

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent