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#fasttrack

By | Soil Health Resource Guide

Ley Farming: the fast track to soil improvement by Dale Strickler Just a few years ago, the idea of cover crops seemed rather radical to many folks. Planting a crop for the primary purpose of soil improvement was considered a waste of money by most people in agriculture. Over time,…

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#ryevsryegrass

By | Grass, Soil Health Resource Guide

Rye vs. Ryegrass Many people, understandably, are confused by the difference between rye and ryegrass. These two plants, despite the similarity in names, are not closely related and do not behave alike. Rye (Secale cereal) is a cereal grain, closely related to wheat, with which it can be crossed to…

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#millet

By | Grass, Soil Health Resource Guide

Millets are a diverse group of summer annual grasses that fit a variety of needs. Pearl millet (Genus Pennisetum) has the highest yield potential among millets because of its hybrid heterosis. Because millets have no prussic acid potential, hybrid pearl millet is preferred for grazing under conditions in which prussic…

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#sorghum

By | Grass, Soil Health Resource Guide

What is your best sorghum forage variety? By Dale Strickler Over most of my career, I actually did not get this question. I was usually asked, “What is the cheapest sorghum you carry?”. I am glad we are to the point where most people realize the cheapest product on the…

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#insects

By | Soil Health Resource Guide

Diversity and Pest Management by Jonathan Lundgren, Ph.D Humans have been battling against bugs for millennia and history has shown that insects have killed more humans than bullets or bombs through disease transmission. But not all insects are pests — for every harmful insect there are 1700 beneficial or neutral…

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#milpa

By | Soil Health Resource Guide

Milpa Gardens serving the local Communities The Milpa system is a traditional intercropping system used throughout Mesoamerica that was originally designed by the Mayans. Traditionally, Milpa gardens still use the “three sister” concept with Maize, squash, and beans, but they also add much more species for diversity into the system!…

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#wildlife

By | Soil Health Resource Guide

God’s creation is extremely diverse and there are no monoculture plant communities in natural settings, so why should wildlife food plots be any different? Whether you’re targeting a specific wildlife species for hunting or merely supplying a wildlife sanctuary, it’s all about creating a balanced oasis. Wildlife will thrive and…

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#nitrates

By | Soil Health Resource Guide

Nitrate Poisoning Nitrate poisoning can occur when growing forages have excessive amounts of nitrates in the soil and/or when the forage becomes stressed. When high nitrate forages are ingested by a ruminant animal, the nitrate is converted to nitrite, which when excessively absorbed into the bloodstream can cause the blood…

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#prussicacid

By | Soil Health Resource Guide

Prussic acid is a potentially dangerous substance that is produced by plants in the sorghum family. Increased prussic acid concentrations can occur with freshly frost killed forage, new plant growth (under 24” tall), drought stressed crops, freshly cured hay or chopped silage, and high nitrogen conditions. Sorghum species provide excellent…

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#horsepasture

By | Soil Health Resource Guide

Pasture management for horses By Dale Strickler It is important to have realistic expectations of yield per acre and an accurate estimate of acreage to determine carrying capacity. There are biological limitations to how much vegetation can be produced on an acre. Typically in Kansas and Nebraska, moisture is the…

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