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#cctest

By | Soil Health Resource Guide

If you are committed to quantifying how your cover crop performed, taking biomass samples is a critical next level step. This takes your visual observations or feelings and puts some numbers behind it. Before you take these samples, determine what you want to learn from your test. There are essentially…

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#soiltest

By | Soil Health Resource Guide

Biotesting Information (PLFA) Lance Gunderson, Ward Laboratories Inc. Soil is a complex ecosystem that provides a habitat for an endless array of micro and some macro-organisms. These include bacteria, fungi, protozoa, nematodes, earthworms, etc. These organisms are responsible for much of the nutrient cycling that takes place in the soil….

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#fallmix

By | Soil Health Resource Guide

Cover crops seeded into or after fall-harvested crops can be beneficial for the soil, but can present challenges for seeding the covers. Fall mixtures vary greatly depending on your goals, planting method, and timing. Here are some basic guidelines to follow: Planting 4-5 weeks prior to first frost You can…

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#summermix

By | Soil Health Resource Guide

Late spring and early summer plantings are commonly utilized as a forage source for livestock when summer heat begins to reduce cool season grass forage production. These mixes can also be used on prevented planting acres to add biological diversity, suppress weeds, produce nitro-gen, and cycle nutrients during the prevented…

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#springmix

By | Soil Health Resource Guide

Spring plantings are commonly utilized to jump-start soil biology after a long cold winter. These cover mixes are used to “prime” the soil biology ahead of a later spring planted crop. Spring mixes are also used in the western Great Plains as a “fallow replacement”, where a living cover provides…

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#forbs

By | Soil Health Resource Guide

Jump to Article: Ley farming (including perennial pasture in the crop rotation) Ley Farming: The Fast Track to Soil Improvement Forbs the Forgotten Third Component of Pastures Ley Farming (including perennial pasture in the crop rotation) By Dale Strickler One of the main purposes people have for planting cover crops…

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#fasttrack

By | Soil Health Resource Guide

Ley Farming: the fast track to soil improvement by Dale Strickler Just a few years ago, the idea of cover crops seemed rather radical to many folks. Planting a crop for the primary purpose of soil improvement was considered a waste of money by most people in agriculture. Over time,…

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#ryevsryegrass

By | Grass, Soil Health Resource Guide

Rye vs. Ryegrass Many people, understandably, are confused by the difference between rye and ryegrass. These two plants, despite the similarity in names, are not closely related and do not behave alike. Rye (Secale cereal) is a cereal grain, closely related to wheat, with which it can be crossed to…

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#millet

By | Grass, Soil Health Resource Guide

Millets are a diverse group of summer annual grasses that fit a variety of needs. Pearl millet (Genus Pennisetum) has the highest yield potential among millets because of its hybrid heterosis. Because millets have no prussic acid potential, hybrid pearl millet is preferred for grazing under conditions in which prussic…

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#sorghum

By | Grass, Soil Health Resource Guide

What is your best sorghum forage variety? By Dale Strickler Over most of my career, I actually did not get this question. I was usually asked, “What is the cheapest sorghum you carry?”. I am glad we are to the point where most people realize the cheapest product on the…

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